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NS2 2013 Projects

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An Efficient and Robust Addressing Protocol for Node Auto configuration in Ad Hoc Networks

ABSTRACT:

Address assignment is a key challenge in ad hoc networks due to the lack of infrastructure. Autonomous addressing protocols require a distributed and self-managed mechanism to avoid address collisions in a dynamic network with fading channels, frequent partitions, and joining/leaving nodes. We propose and analyze a lightweight protocol that configures mobile ad hoc nodes based on a distributed address database stored in filters that reduces the control load and makes the proposal robust to packet losses and network partitions. We evaluate the performance of our protocol, considering joining nodes, partition merging events, and network initialization. Simulation results show that our protocol resolves all the address collisions and also reduces the control traffic when compared to previously proposed protocols.

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Enhanced OLSR for Defense against DOS Attack in Ad Hoc Networks

ABSTRACT:

A mobile ad hoc network (MANET) refers to a network designed for special applications for which it is difficult to use a backbone network. In MANETs, applications are mostly involved with sensitive and secret information. Since MANET assumes a trusted environment for routing, security is a major issue. In this paper we analyze the vulnerabilities of a pro-active routing protocol called optimized link state routing (OLSR) against a specific type of denial-of-service (DOS) attack called node isolation attack. Analyzing the attack, we propose a mechanism called enhanced OLSR (EOLSR) protocol which is a trust based technique to secure the OLSR nodes against the attack. Our technique is capable of finding whether a node is advertising correct topology information or not by verifying its Hello packets, thus detecting node isolation attacks. The experiment results show that our protocol is able to achieve routing security with 45% increase in packet delivery ratio and 44% reduction in packet loss rate when compared to standard OLSR under node isolation attack. Our technique is light weight because it doesn’t involve high computational complexity for securing the networks.

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Toward a Statistical Framework for Source Anonymity in Sensor Networks

ABSTRACT:

In certain applications, the locations of events reported by a sensor network need to remain anonymous. That is, unauthorized observers must be unable to detect the origin of such events by analyzing the network traffic. Known as the source anonymity problem, this problem has emerged as an important topic in the security of wireless sensor networks, with variety of techniques based on different adversarial assumptions being proposed. In this work, we present a new framework for modeling, analyzing, and evaluating anonymity in sensor networks. The novelty of the proposed framework is twofold: first, it introduces the notion of “interval indistinguishability” and provides a quantitative measure to model anonymity in wireless sensor networks; second, it maps source anonymity to the statistical problem of binary hypothesis testing with nuisance parameters. We then analyze existing solutions for designing anonymous sensor networks using the proposed model. We show how mapping source anonymity to binary hypothesis testing with nuisance parameters leads to converting the problem of exposing private source information into searching for an appropriate data transformation that removes or minimize the effect of the nuisance information. By doing so, we transform the problem from analyzing real-valued sample points to binary codes, which opens the door for coding theory to be incorporated into the study of anonymous sensor networks. Finally, we discuss how existing solutions can be modified to improve their anonymity.

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Target Tracking and Mobile Sensor Navigation in Wireless Sensor Networks

ABSTRACT:

This work studies the problem of tracking signal-emitting mobile targets using navigated mobile sensors based on signal reception. Since the mobile target’s maneuver is unknown, the mobile sensor controller utilizes the measurement collected by a wireless sensor network in terms of the mobile target signal’s time of arrival (TOA). The mobile sensor controller acquires the TOA measurement information from both the mobile target and the mobile sensor for estimating their locations before directing the mobile sensor’s movement to follow the target. We propose a min-max approximation approach to estimate the location for tracking which can be efficiently solved via semi definite programming (SDP) relaxation, and apply a cubic function for mobile sensor navigation. We estimate the location of the mobile sensor and target jointly to improve the tracking accuracy. To further improve the system performance, we propose a weighted tracking algorithm by using the measurement information more efficiently. Our results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm provides good tracking performance and can quickly direct the mobile sensor to follow the mobile target.

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Proteus: Multiflow Diversity Routing for Wireless Networks with Cooperative Transmissions

ABSTRACT:

In this paper, we consider the use of cooperative transmissions in multihop wireless networks to achieve Virtual Multiple Input Single Output (VMISO) links. Specifically, we investigate how the physical layer VMISO benefits translate into network level performance improvements. We show that the improvements are nontrivial (15 to 300 percent depending on the node density) but rely on two crucial algorithmic decisions: the number of cooperating transmitters for each link; and the cooperation strategy used by the transmitters. We explore the tradeoffs in making routing decisions using analytical models and derive the key routing considerations. Finally, we present Proteus, an adaptive diversity routing protocol that includes algorithmic solutions to the above two decision problems and leverages VMISO links in multihop wireless network to achieve performance improvements. We evaluate Proteus using NS2-based simulations with an enhanced physical layer model that accurately captures the effect of VMISO transmissions

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Opportunistic MANETs: Mobility Can Make Up for Low Transmission Power

ABSTRACT:

Opportunistic mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) are a special class of sparse and disconnected MANETs where data communication exploits sporadic contact opportunities among nodes. We consider opportunistic MANETs where nodes move independently at random over a square of the plane. Nodes exchange data if they are at a distance at most within each other, where is the node transmission radius. The flooding time is the number of time-steps required to broadcast a message from a source node to every node of the network. Flooding time is an important measure of how fast information can spread in dynamic networks. We derive the first upper bound on the flooding time, which is a decreasing function of the maximal speed of the nodes. The bound holds with high probability, and it is nearly tight. Our bound shows that, thanks to node mobility, even when the network is sparse and disconnected, information spreading can be fast.

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Efficient Algorithms for Neighbor Discovery in Wireless Networks

ABSTRACT:

Neighbor discovery is an important first step in the initialization of a wireless ad hoc network. In this paper, we design and analyze several algorithms for neighbor discovery in wireless networks. Starting with a single-hop wireless network of nodes, we propose a ALOHA-like neighbor discovery algorithm when nodes cannot detect collisions, and an order-optimal receiver feedback-based algorithm when nodes can detect collisions. Our algorithms neither require nodes to have a priori estimates of the number of neighbors nor synchronization between nodes. Our algorithms allow nodes to begin execution at different time instants and to terminate neighbor discovery upon discovering all their neighbors. We finally show that receiver feedback can be used to achieve a running time, even when nodes cannot detect collisions. We then analyze neighbor discovery in a general multihop setting. We establish an upper bound of on the running time of the ALOHA-like algorithm, where denotes the maximum node degree in the network and the total number of nodes. We also establish a lower bound of on the running time of any randomized neighbor discovery algorithm. Our result thus implies that the ALOHA-like algorithm is at most a factor worse than optimal.

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EAACK—A Secure Intrusion-Detection System for MANETs

ABSTRACT:

The migration to wireless network from wired network has been a global trend in the past few decades. The mobility and scalability brought by wireless network made it possible in many applications. Among all the contemporary wireless networks, Mobile Ad hoc NETwork (MANET) is one of the most important and unique applications. On the contrary to traditional network architecture, MANET does not require a fixed network infrastructure; every single node works as both a transmitter and a receiver. Nodes communicate directly with each other when they are both within the same communication range. Otherwise, they rely on their neighbors to relay messages. The self-configuring ability of nodes inMANETmade it popular among critical mission applications like military use or emergency recovery. However, the open medium and wide distribution of nodes make MANET vulnerable to malicious attackers. In this case, it is crucial to develop efficient intrusion-detection mechanisms to protect MANET from attacks. With the improvements of the technology and cut in hardware costs, we are witnessing a current trend of expanding MANETs into industrial applications. To adjust to such trend, we strongly believe that it is vital to address its potential security issues. In this paper, we propose and implement a new intrusion-detection system named Enhanced Adaptive ACKnowledgment (EAACK) specially designed for MANETs. Compared to contemporary approaches, EAACK demonstrates higher malicious-behavior-detection rates in certain circumstances while does not greatly affect the network performances.

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Distributed Cooperative Caching in Social Wireless Networks

ABSTRACT:

This paper introduces cooperative caching policies for minimizing electronic content provisioning cost in Social Wireless Networks (SWNET).SWNETs are formed by mobile devices, such as data enabled phones, electronic book readers etc., sharing common interests in electronic content, and physically gathering together in public places. Electronic object caching in such SWNETs are shown to be able to reduce the content provisioning cost which depends heavily on the service and pricing dependences among various stakeholders including content providers (CP), network service providers, and End Consumers (EC). Drawing motivation from Amazon’s Kindle electronic book delivery business, this paper develops practical network, service, and pricing models which are then used for creating two object caching strategies for minimizing content provisioning costs in networks with homogenous and heterogeneous object demands. The paper constructs analytical and simulation models for analyzing the proposed caching strategies in the presence of selfish users that deviate from network-wide cost-optimal policies. It also reports results from an Android phone based prototype SWNET, validating the presented analytical and simulation results.

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Discovery and Verification of Neighbor Positions in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

ABSTRACT:

A growing number of ad hoc networking protocols and location-aware services require that mobile nodes learn the position of their neighbors. However, such a process can be easily abused or disrupted by adversarial nodes. In absence of a priori trusted nodes, the discovery and verification of neighbor positions presents challenges that have been scarcely investigated in the literature. In this paper, we address this open issue by proposing a fully distributed cooperative solution that is robust against independent and colluding adversaries, and can be impaired only by an overwhelming presence of adversaries. Results show that our protocol can thwart more than 99 percent of the attacks under the best possible conditions for the adversaries, with minimal false positive rates.

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BAHG: Back-Bone-Assisted Hop Greedy Routing for VANET’s City Environments

ABSTRACT:

Using advanced wireless local area network technologies, vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) have become viable and valuable for their wide variety of novel applications, such as road safety, multimedia content sharing, commerce on wheels, etc. Multihop information dissemination in VANETs is constrained by the high mobility of vehicles and the frequent disconnections. Currently, geographic routing protocols are widely adopted for VANETs as they do not require route construction and route maintenance phases. Again, with connectivity awareness, they perform well in terms of reliable delivery. To obtain destination position, some protocols use flooding, which can be detrimental in city environments? Further, in the case of sparse and void regions, frequent use of the recovery strategy elevates hop count. Some geographic routing protocols adopt the minimum weighted algorithm based on distance or connectivity to select intermediate intersections. However, the shortest path or the path with higher connectivity may include numerous intermediate intersections. As a result, these protocols yield routing paths with higher hop count. In this paper, we propose a hop greedy routing scheme that yields a routing path with the minimum number of intermediate intersection nodes while taking connectivity into consideration. Moreover, we introduce back-bone nodes that play a key role in providing connectivity status around an intersection. Apart from this, by tracking the movement of source as well as destination, the back-bone nodes enable a packet to be forwarded in the changed direction. Simulation results signify the benefits of the proposed routing strategy in terms of high packet delivery ratio and shorter end-to-end delay.

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Back-Pressure-Based Packet-by-Packet Adaptive Routing in Communication Networks

ABSTRACT:

Back-pressure-based adaptive routing algorithms where each packet is routed along a possibly different path have been extensively studied in the literature. However, such algorithms typically result in poor delay performance and involve high implementation complexity. In this paper, we develop a new adaptive routing algorithm built upon the widely studied back-pressure algorithm. We decouple the routing and scheduling components of the algorithm by designing a probabilistic routing table that is used to route packets to per-destination queues. The scheduling decisions in the case of wireless networks are made using counters called shadow queues. The results are also extended to the case of networks that employ simple forms of network coding. In that case, our algorithm provides a low-complexity solution to optimally exploit the routing–coding tradeoff.

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ALERT: An Anonymous Location-Based Efficient Routing Protocol in MANETs

ABSTRACT:

Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs) use anonymous routing protocols that hide node identities and/or routes from outside observers in order to provide anonymity protection. However, existing anonymous routing protocols relying on either hop-by-hop encryption or redundant traffic either generate high cost or cannot provide full anonymity protection to data sources, destinations, and routes. The high cost exacerbates the inherent resource constraint problem in MANETs especially in multimedia wireless applications. To offer high anonymity protection at a low cost, we propose an Anonymous Location-based Efficient Routing protocol (ALERT). ALERT dynamically partitions the network field into zones and randomly chooses nodes in zones as intermediate relay nodes, which form a nontraceable anonymous route. In addition, it hides the data initiator/receiver among many initiators/receivers to strengthen source and destination anonymity protection. Thus, ALERT offers anonymity protection to sources, destinations, and routes. It also has strategies to effectively counter intersection and timing attacks. We theoretically analyze ALERT in terms of anonymity and efficiency. Experimental results exhibit consistency with the theoretical analysis, and show that ALERT achieves better route anonymity protection and lower cost compared to other anonymous routing protocols. Also, ALERT achieves comparable routing efficiency to the GPSR geographical routing protocol.

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Adaptive Position Update for Geographic Routing in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

ABSTRACT:

In geographic routing, nodes need to maintain up-to-date positions of their immediate neighbors for making effective forwarding decisions. Periodic broadcasting of beacon packets that contain the geographic location coordinates of the nodes is a popular method used by most geographic routing protocols to maintain neighbor positions. We contend and demonstrate that periodic beaconing regardless of the node mobility and traffic patterns in the network is not attractive from both update cost and routing performance points of view. We propose the Adaptive Position Update (APU) strategy for geographic routing, which dynamically adjusts the frequency of position updates based on the mobility dynamics of the nodes and the forwarding patterns in the network. APU is based on two simple principles: 1) nodes whose movements are harder to predict update their positions more frequently (and vice versa), and (ii) nodes closer to forwarding paths update their positions more frequently (and vice versa). Our theoretical analysis, which is validated by NS2 simulations of a well-known geographic routing protocol, Greedy Perimeter Stateless Routing Protocol (GPSR), shows that APU can significantly reduce the update cost and improve the routing performance in terms of packet delivery ratio and average end-to-end delay in comparison with periodic beaconing and other recently proposed updating schemes. The benefits of APU are further confirmed by undertaking evaluations in realistic network scenarios, which account for localization error, realistic radio propagation, and sparse network

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A Rank Correlation Based Detection against Distributed Reflection DoS Attacks

ABSTRACT:

DDoS presents a serious threat to the Internet since its inception, where lots of controlled hosts flood the victim site with massive packets. Moreover, in Distributed Reflection DoS (DRDoS), attackers fool innocent servers (reflectors) into flushing packets to the victim. But most of current DRDoS detection mechanisms are associated with specific protocols and cannot be used for unknown protocols. It is found that because of being stimulated by the same attacking flow, the responsive flows from reflectors have inherent relations: the packet rate of one converged responsive flow may have linear relationships with another. Based on this observation, the Rank Correlation based Detection (RCD) algorithm is proposed. The preliminary simulations indicate that RCD can differentiate reflection flows from legitimate ones efficiently and effectively, thus can be used as a useable indicator for DRDoS.

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